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Posted by RiaanR 
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avatar General Questions
February 02, 2011 04:29PM
Question in prescribed text...
Describe a situation where the client, developer, and user is the same person.
Unless you have a split personality. winking smiley

I can't think of any, can anybody give me a example please?
Also, where can I get the answers to the prescribed text book?
Re: General Questions
February 08, 2011 12:21PM
Maybe if you want to develop a system to store your code.

Something similar to cvs or svn, but those don't work out so well for you so you want to write your own.

Bug tracking system.

Incident/work request system


etc
avatar
Mac
Re: General Questions
February 08, 2011 02:21PM
RiaanR Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I can't think of any, can anybody give me a
> example please?

When you develop apps to automate your own tasks.
Linuxers do it all the time.

> Also, where can I get the answers to the
> prescribed text book?

They are too huge to make available sad smiley But do not concern yourself too much with those answers. Rather look at old papers.
avatar Re: General Questions
February 08, 2011 06:41PM
Thank you for the tip Mac!

Another question: How does the Agile development approaches relate to open source development?
Answer: New versions released often. No real design. Code/working software is the main goal. Constant feedback from users /developers. Requirements change.

Does that sound right?
avatar
Mac
Re: General Questions
February 08, 2011 09:01PM
Sounds good! Except "no real design" is a perhaps a bit harsh. It starts of with a "real" design, but grows with requirements. Be careful to fit an approach with definitions from the handbook. As I said to another student in the week - some books (and academics) force their definitions and viewpoints down on you. And the handbook is open to criticism. At postgrad level we are far more interested in how you motivate your answer - even if if your original view is flawed to some extent. This does not mean that you can write gobbledygook (I had to check the spelling on this word) though. You could probably add some good arguments based on your own experience. Do not be afraid to argue your own viewpoints - it is relatively easy to pick up when an argument is substantiated by a (I want to say even a "general"winking smiley knowledge of the field, as opposed to that big word here above.
avatar Re: General Questions
February 08, 2011 09:57PM
Thank you for the answer.

Next question: (and really anyone can answer, feeling privileged that Mac answers all my questions already!) smiling smiley
_________ is usually undertaken in order to redesign the system for better
maintainability or to produce a copy of a system without access to the design
from which it was originally produced.
A Reverse engineering
B Reengineering
C Legacy engineering
D System engineering
E Unified process

Surely A and B is correct here...if the question left out "or to produce a copy..." it would have only been A...becuase you reverse engineer to get design documents normally for older legacy systems where there are no/ only a few design documents. But if you want to go back to a working system "or to produce a copy" you will have to forward engineer again....and that would mean B. But a Reengineered system would technically also be
more maintanable...So B is the "more" correct answer?
avatar Re: General Questions
February 08, 2011 10:28PM
But the answers from the real world might be biased based on the real world experiences you had, and who am I to argue with someone that has more real life experience than me...but like you said, supporting evidence for a flawed view point. I'll keep that in mind.
avatar Re: General Questions
February 08, 2011 11:21PM
So to add to your statement above, the question: "discuss possible counter-arguments that you could receive from management regarding the switch over from structured to OO approach"
If one of the answers are: job loss, due to the company moving to the new approach and not needing that many developers for maintenance on existing systems. (thats if they do not want to learn new OO approach)
would be a correct answer? What about the idea of resistance to change / comfort zone. (or am I pushing the idea to far?)
(I don't think Schach mentions something like this)
avatar
Mac
Re: General Questions
February 09, 2011 06:54AM
grinning smileyRiaanR Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> So to add to your statement above, the question:
> "discuss possible counter-arguments that you could

That would be correct (although it is unlikely that StdBank's management will use this as a counter argument grinning smiley ).

It is not just about real-world experiences (it helps!) - what you are doing is moving away from a section in the handbook by importing other sections, knowledge gained in other modules, research papers that you have (hopefully) read, a newspaper article you remember (like my StdBank chirp here above), so resistance to change/comfort zone is absolutely valid!
Re: General Questions
February 09, 2011 09:05AM
Hi Riaan

I would agree with your argument for "B" above (re-engineering).

As for the arguing to support a flawed viewpoint - who is to say the view point will always be flawed! Many people in history have been proven correct in the end grinning smiley

I like you socio-organizational approach to the OO-shift (resistance to change etc). It is the same way I argue those questions. While I appreciate the cost-benefit analysis arguments related to "training, new staff, new software etc", those are straight-line costs and easy to compute compared to socio-organizational issues. A disgruntled employee who puts on a brave face and pretends to accepts the changes is far more expensive than a new IDE (especially if you use OSS ones like NetBeans / Eclipse or Mono - shameless OSS plug grinning smiley )
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